Minoxidil beard supplements

While beneficial for facial hair growth and regrowing lost hair, minoxidil can still cause some undesirable side effects such as a dry, red skin that can turn into flaking in some extreme cases.

And although these side effects are rare, they are still worth mentioning. Minoxidil beard supplements can help to prevent negative ramifications such as drying out the skin, gaining an increasing amount of wrinkles, and prematurely aging the skin in general.

Let us first discover why minoxidil can be bad for the skin in some cases.

 

Why minoxidil can be bad for the skin

Image of a woman experiencing skin irritation on her cheeks.

There are two key factors why minoxidil can contribute to a poor or less than optimal skin health. These two are:

  • Poor collagen production and synthesis.
  • Alcohol preservatives that dry out the skin.

Minoxidil inhibits lysyl hydroxylase expression, a critical enzyme in collagen production and collagen synthesis. Not only that, it stops fibroblasts from proliferating. Or, in simpler terms, from dividing. This means people using minoxidil to grow a beard or to increase their hair count will have a smaller fibroblast cell count. Furthermore, minoxidil often contains alcohol to preserve the minoxidil longer and to maintain its texture. But, alcohol can cause a dry and flaky skin.

However, it is currently unknown how much it impacts collagen production and thus, how much harm it causes to the skin.

What’s the function of collagen? Well basically, collagen keeps our skin elastic and firm.

A lack or lessening of collagen means a paler skin tone, dark circles around the eyes because your bones are showing through, forehead wrinkles, frizzier/darker hair, bushier looking eyebrows, and thinner eyelashes.

Collagen isn’t the only thing that shapes our hair color, by the way.

Keep in mind that you will have little to no collagen in your skin at all when using minoxidil, but the elastin in the skin will be normal, so you won’t suddenly look 20 years older.

 

Minoxidil skin irritation

Furthermore, minoxidil can potentially cause skin irritation other than decreasing your overall skin health.

Minoxidil can cause red skin due to drying it out, especially when used on a sensitive skin. Minoxidil can thus cause a dry skin that gets flaky in extreme cases.

Collagen loss is one of the main reasons for wrinkles as part of the aging process. Collagen helps with hair growth and hair regeneration since it is a natural antioxidant. It helps to promote healthy hair, which of course starts from the inside.

 

Minoxidil supplements

Image of a bottle of vitamin C serum.
A bottle of vitamin C serum to supplement the skin.

Since minoxidil inhibits collagen production, you can and should use a vitamin C serum, tretinoin and collagen supplements to increase skin cell turnover.

Not to mention that it will make the alcohol in the minoxidil dry out your skin less severly. Of course, it’s also possible to use alcohol free minoxidil as a healthier alternative for your skin.

Making sure to apply sunscreen when going out in the sun for prolonged periods of time is important as well to protect your skin and to prevent skin cancer such as melanomas.

Essential to note is that the negative side effects on the skin will end when you quit using minoxidil. Once the minoxidil has cleared out of your system, then your collagen production will increase again and the alcohol preservative will stop drying out your skin.

 

Conclusion

Although it is currently unknown how much damage minoxidil can cause to one’s skin, it is still advised to use collagen supplements, vitamin C, and tretinoin as precautionary methods in order to keep the skin healthy.

Still, it should be noted that there are many natural ways to promote blood flow to the scalp, which means you’re more likely to grow more, healthier hairs.

From personal experience, my skin didn’t age at all from years of minoxidil use. I didn’t even use any supplements and my skin stayed young, elastic and wrinkle free. Still, it’s better to be safe than sorry, especially if you are worried about possible side effects.